Secondary currencies in the Russian hyperinflation and stabilization of 1921-24
Read Online
Share

Secondary currencies in the Russian hyperinflation and stabilization of 1921-24 by Jacek Rostowski

  • 649 Want to read
  • ·
  • 78 Currently reading

Published by Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Political Science in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Inflation (Finance) -- Soviet Union -- History -- 20th century.,
  • Soviet Union -- Economic policy -- 1917-1928.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementJacek Rostowski and Judith Shapiro.
SeriesDiscussion paper / Centre for Economic Performance -- no.59, Discussion paper (Centre for Economic Performance) -- no.59.
ContributionsShapiro, Judith, 19---, London School of Economics and Political Science. Centre for Economic Performance.
The Physical Object
Pagination37p. ;
Number of Pages37
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21708463M

Download Secondary currencies in the Russian hyperinflation and stabilization of 1921-24

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Secondary currencies in the Russian hyperinflation and stabilization of London: Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Political Science, (OCoLC) The introduction of a secondary currency, the chevronets, played an important and beneficial role during hyperinflation in Soviet Russia in the early s. This sophisticated strategy was crowned by the execution of a successful stabilization in March , despite the persistence of a Author: J. Rostowski and J. Shapiro. Post-stabilization Inflation in (). Secondary Currencies in the Russian Hyperinflation and Stabilization of ", London School of Economics, Centre for Economic Performance, Discussion Paper : Jacek Rostowski. ‘Forgotten Female Soldiers in an Unknown Army’: German women working behind the lines, – Secondary Currencies in the Russian Hyperinflation and Stabilization of Author: Helen Boak.

Many cases exist of multiple currency usage throughout history. As two leading examples, secondary currencies were widespread during both the Great Depression in the United States and the   This article reviews and analyzes the causes of Ukraine's inflationary impulse, the descent into hyperinflation in –94, its effects, and the subsequent drive to stabilization by It concludes that a substantial erosion of the inflation tax base by late propelled the government to pursue stabilization through an IMF‐sponsored Cited by: 8. 1. Introduction. The rapid depreciation of the Russian ruble (RUR) and of the currencies of other countries of the former Soviet Union (FSU) in – revived the question of macroeconomic stability in this region, a question that has arisen several times since the Soviet Union's collapse in Cited by: 6. The identified cointegrating relations showed that money growth was weakly exogenous and affected inflation via currency depreciation. This indicates the presence of exchange-rate-based pricing, whereas the exogeneity of money implies that money was the common stochastic trend fueling currency depreciation and by:

Secondary currencies in the Russian hyperinflation and stabilization of by Jacek Rostowski (Book). A boy with a kite made of banknotes in Germany, during the depression when escalating inflation rendered much currency worthless. [×] Kite Making, Art Berlin, Worthless, Historical Photos, Trees To Plant, First World, Kids Playing, World War, Drag.   This paper anlayzes the Georgian hyperinflation of , which featured endogenous fiscal expenditures and the money supply, depreciation, and currency substitution. Hyperinflation was stopped by removing generalized consumer subsidies and tightening of monetary policy, and not by a sudden rush of credibility or imposition of an exchange rate by: 6.   Inflation occurs when the price of a country's goods and services rise while there is a loss in that currencies real value. Hyperinflation occurs when inflation gets out of hand and prices of.